My husband, Ted Andreasian, and I are following the evolution of photography. Several years ago, we made the transition from film photography to digital and from processing in the darkroom to the computer. We have learned multiple styles and nuances of shooting, and have now found joy using long exposure photographic techniques with our love of architecture. We are attracted to the esthetics of finished photographic work, combined with the complexity of the process of long exposure photography.

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Ted Andreasian: The Hotel Let us on the Roof. Dubai

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Nune Karamyan: Abu Dhabi from the Bird’s Eye View.

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Nune Karamyan: Dubai from the Bird’s Eye View.

Futuristic architecture of the United Arab Emirates. Cities seem surreal because of the absence of cars and people. The Emirates have more gold than rain. When it rains, usually two to three days per year, people run out onto the streets, get wet, and photograph the rare atmospheric precipitations--banal stuff for most of us. Yet, during our three-week trip, it was raining every other day, which, really, was lucky for us. Since rain comes with clouds, we had the dynamic skies we need for beautiful long exposure photographs.

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Nune Karamyan: Light of Zaha Hadid.

This photograph was taken three days after the untimely death of the architect of this masterpiece- Zaha Hadid, and it is devoted to her memory. Technical details: Panorama from three frames. Exposure of each frame is about five minutes. This is Sheikh Zayed Bridge in Abu Dhabi.

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Ted Andreasian: Butterfly Path.

This title is easily deciphered. This laced bridge leads towards the pavilion with a live butterfly exhibit. Photograph is taken in Sharjah.

For us, long-exposure photography provides the opportunity to include the passage of time in one still frame. The length of one shot being from more than thirty seconds to twelve minutes brings to the photograph glistening water, dynamic clouds and a general serenity of space. At the same time, long-exposure techniques accentuate the stillness of immovable objects, the timelessness of architecture and its surroundings, and removes passersby from the frame.

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Nune Karamyan: Arabian Tale. Dubai.

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Ted Andreasian: Electric Dubai.

Both photographs are taken from a construction site. Looking the part, we followed other workers and waved to the security guard who let us through the gate into the construction zone. We divided. Tripod. Camera. Filters…Go! Couple of photographs and we were successfully spotted and politely asked to get behind the fence.

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Nune Karamyan: Emirates Towers.

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Ted Andreasian: Burj Al Arab.

Both Emirates Towers and Burj Al Arab are icons of Dubai style. We could not miss the opportunity to capture them.

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Ted Andreasian: Upper Down.

Burj Khalifa is taken looking up. Our eye sometimes deceives us and instead of the building upward we see a spaceship looking towards planet Earth.


Pleasure comes from the surprise in how these multiple elements combine to produce a photographic work. Since the exposure occurs over time and the resulting image is a surprise, we are, in a sense, back in the darkroom, where the final artwork was unclear until the film was developed and the image printed and drying. In the digital age of photography, this transition from uncertain image to final artwork is perhaps the most satisfying element of long-exposure photography and one we look most forward to. To capture the pleasure of seeing a finished work, we have also become our own master printers. 


It is early May and still cool in Armenia. It is much colder, however, at six o’clock in the morning, at 2300m, under ceaseless almost-freezing rain on the foothills of snow-clad mount Aragats. Armen Yengoyan gave us a ride to Amberd on his forty-year old veteran 02 heroic Zhiguli and he was enthusiastically taking photographs and getting soaked together with us. We walked around under Armen-improvised cellophane capes, doing reconnaissance of the topography. With a dry window of about forty minutes, we were able to take some shots. These are the results.

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Ted Andreasian: Amberd Fortress.

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Ted Andreasian: Amberd Church.

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Nune Karamyan: Amberd Fortress.

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Nune Karamyan: Ararat, Armenia.

Symbol of my motherland and a place I go to gather energy and strength to move further with my life. Photograph is taken from the roof of my house.

For us, Japan is a country as different as another planet. Different by its culture and advance technologies. It did not take us long to become comfortable. 

In February of this year, we were honored to be selected winners in the Architecture Category of the Tokyo International Photo Awards and were invited to the opening of the exhibition in Tokyo, featuring our works and other winning works in TIFA competition. Using the chance we photographed non-stop

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Nune Karamyan: Kyomizudera Temple.

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Ted Andreasian: Kyomizudera Temple.

Literally translated as Temple of Clear Water

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Nune Karamyan: Fushimi Inari.

More than five thousand Torii gates are forming two corridors leading up to the top of mount Inari. Half way to the top, the view of Kyoto opened up. The gates are symbolizing entrance to the sacred area and they believe, that if someone reaches success, he needs to gift a Torii gate to the temple.

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Ted Andreasian: Togetsu-Kyo

A wooden bridge, more than four hundred years old. This bridge played its role in an initiation ritual. Children would receive a blessing in the local temple and needed to cross the whole bridge without looking back once.

Today, we are in the stage of processing photos of old and new Japan. Expect new works!

Thank you for reading! 

Additional works you can see on our website: www.tedandnune.com

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